Report | Environment New Hampshire

The Way Forward on Global Warming

New Hampshire could reduce its energy consumption by 32% by focusing on straightforward state-based policies. National gridlock on climate policy need not thwart progress.

 

Report | Environment New Hampshire Research & Policy Center

Danger in the Air: Unhealthy Air Days in 2010 and 2011

All Americans should be able to breathe clean air.  But pollution from power plants and vehicles puts the health of our nation’s children and families at risk.  Ground-level ozone, the main component of smog, is one of the most harmful and one of the most pervasive air pollutants.  According to the American Lung Association, nearly half of all Americans – 48 percent – still live in areas with unhealthy levels of smog pollution.  Studies show that on days with high concentrations of smog pollution in the air, children and adults suffer more asthma attacks, increased respiratory difficulty, and reduced lung function.  Exposure to smog pollution can exacerbate respiratory illness and even cause premature death.  Sensitive populations including children, the elderly, and people with respiratory illness are particularly at risk of the adverse health effects of air pollution. 

Report | Environment New Hampshire Research & Policy Center

Getting Off Oil: A 50 State Roadmap for Curbing our Dependence on Petroleum

America’s dependence on oil inflicts a heavy toll on our environment – polluting our ocean waters, destroying natural landscapes and fouling our air. With oil companies taking greater and greater risks to satisfy the world’s demand for oil, the environmental toll of America’s oil dependence continues to rise. 

Report | Environment New Hampshire Research & Policy Center

Global Warming and Extreme Weather

Patterns of extreme weather are changing in the United States, and climate science predicts that further changes are in store. Extreme weather events lead to billions of dollars in economic damage and loss of life each year. Scientists project that global warming could affect the frequency, timing, location and severity of many types of extreme weather events in the decades to come.

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