The cost of our oil addiction

New Hampshire is one of the most oil-dependent states in the nation. Families are paying more than ever for our addiction to oil. With our cold winters and rising global demand, oil dependence takes an enormous bite out of our paychecks and our economy. But the prices that we pay at the pump are only a fraction of the true costs of our addiction to oil. 

We pay for it with our lungs, every time we breathe in air pollution released by cars and trucks.

We also pay for our oil with our beaches, coasts and oceans.  In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster dumped 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico and contaminated thousands of miles of coastline. And in 2011, an ExxonMobil pipeline spilled and dumped 42,000 gallons of oil into the Yellowstone River, which runs through the national park.

It doesn't have to be this way. And in 2011, Environment New Hampshire and our allies made encouraging inroads in our effort to break America's oil addiction.

At 54.5 mpg, a big move to get America off oil

Last summer, in the wake of the Yellowstone spill, our staff and allies got straight to work, mobilizing 10,000 people to voice their support for cleaner cars that use less oil.

The Obama administration responded with fuel efficiancy standards for cars and light trucks, finalized in August. The standards represent the largest single step the U.S. has ever taken to tackle global warming.

The standards will cut carbon pollution from vehicles in the United States by 270 million metric tons—the equivalent of the annual pollution of 40 million of today’s vehicles—and save 1.5 million barrels of oil every day.

What You Can Do: Ten Tips to Get Off Oil

Strong fuel efficiency standards are critical to reducing our oil dependence. However, small changes can also add up to a big difference.

Check out our Top 10 Tips to use less oil and shrink your carbon footprint.


Issue updates

News Release | Environment New Hamsphire

“The pen was mightier than the pipeline.” -- Madeline Page, Environment New Hampshire

CONCORD, NH -- As anticipated, President Obama vetoed legislation to force approval of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. Environment New Hampshire’s Madeline Page issued the following statement:

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News Release | Environment New Hamsphire

New Hampshire House Cuts Funding for Energy Efficiency HB 208

CONCORD—Today, the New Hampshire House of Representatives voted to completely cut funding for energy efficiency out an important program designed to reduce global warming pollution from power plants, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (or RGGI). By a vote of 201-154.

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News Release | Environment New Hamsphire

Environment New Hampshire Testimony in Support of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative

On January 22, 2014, Environment New Hampshire's Madeline Page and Travis Madsen gave oral and written testimony before the New Hampshire House Energy, Science and Technology Committee in support of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. Full written testimony below:

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News Release | Environment New Hampshire

Report: wind energy, tax credits needed to combat global warming

CONCORD, NH -- The carbon pollution equal to that of Merrimack Station—the state’s dirtiest power plant—could be eliminated in New Hampshire if wind power continues its recent growth trajectory, according to a new analysis by Environment New Hampshire. The analysis comes just as Congress considers whether to renew tax credits critical to wind development.

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Report | Environment New Hampshire

More Wind, Less Warming

Expanding wind power across the country could cut as much global warming pollution as 254 coal plants produce in a year, according to a new report, but Congressional action is needed to make that expansion a reality, clean energy advocates said today.
 

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